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Point Rosee Vikings settlement sites North American Sarah

The Point Rosee site itself, located on a small grassy headland surrounded on three sides by the sea. Satellite image by Digital Globe . The remnants of buried structures alter the surrounding soils, changing the amount of moisture they retain. This, in turn, affects vegetation growth. Using certain remote sensing techniques, variations in plant growth form a spectral outline of what was there. Point Rosee (französische Namensform: Pointe Rosée) ist der Name einer Landzunge am südwestlichen Ende der Küste Neufundlands in der Nähe des Dorfes Codroy; die nächstgelegene größere Stadt ist Port aux Basques.Hinweise auf eine nordische Besiedlung in der Wikingerzeit konnten laut einem archäologischen Bericht für das Provincial Archaeology Office in St. John's aus dem Jahr 2017. Update: Archaeologist thinks Codroy Valley may have once been visited by Vikings. Blogger believes recent findings reinforce his own Viking theory. While searching out areas of the North Atlantic to see if she could identify new Norse sites, Point Rosee caught Parcak's attention in 2014. The grassy headland seemed to have subsurface anomalies.

Point Rosee Vikings Norse settlement sites North American

  1. gham had identified the Point Rosee site through satellite images, a technology she used to identify previously unknown sites in Egypt by.
  2. Another possible Viking site, located at a place called Point Rosee in southern Newfoundland, was discovered using satellite imagery
  3. While searching out areas of the North Atlantic to see if she could identify new Norse sites, Point Rosee caught Parcak's attention in 2014. The grassy headland seemed to have subsurface.

Point Rosee is about 600 km away from L'Anse aux Meadows, fitting with a description from the sagas that Vikings sailed south. (Google Maps) The entire area in the region is a good place for farming The possible discovery of a 1,000-year-old Viking site on a Canadian island could rewrite the story of the exploration of North America by Europeans before Christopher Columbus. The unearthing of. The site, discovered in an area called Point Rosee in southern Newfoundland, is 400 miles (643km) south west of a Viking settlement found in L'Anse aux Meadows during the 1960s Auf einer schmalen Halbinsel namens Point Rosee an der südwestlichen Spitze von Neufundland soll laut Parcak ein Ort liegen, an dem die Wikinger bei ihren Amerikafahrten bleibende Spuren.

Archeologists are exploring a possible Viking site in Point Rosee, Newfoundland. It was originally spotted with the help of satellite technology. »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more. That said never say never I think it is inevitable something will be found although that may not be at Point Rosee. I wonder if the iron they have found has been compared to the slag and any roasted bog iron found at L'Anse aux Meadows ? 5:54 am robert said... I travelled to the Codroy Valley in August and was told that NO ONE had shown up to do any archaeological work at Point Rosee over this. The New York Times, View From space Hints at a New Viking Site in North America, by Ralph Blumenthal, March 31, 2016, After two weeks of digging at Point Rosee, an unexpected find in a flooded trench excited the explorers — several seeds, or perhaps blueberries, which were hurriedly sent for testing. The dates came back wildly off — 700 years after the Vikings, maybe even contemporary. This is satellite imagery of Point Rosee in southwestern Newfoundland, a site discovered by Sarah Parcak using remote sensing. She identified it as an area of interest due to the discoloration and the rectilinear and circular, L-shaped features that can be made out in the image suggesting man-made structures reminiscent of Norse (Viking) culture

Scientists have uncovered what may be a previously unknown Viking settlement in Newfoundland, Canada, news sources report. The newly identified site, known as Point Rosee, contains a hearthstone. A team of 14 international experts spent three weeks digging into the dirt of Point Rosee, in N.L.'s Codroy Valley, taking samples and searching for evidence of Vikings Archaeologists may have discovered the second Viking site ever found in North America. It's a truly significant historical find that offers tantalizing evidence of a Viking presence 300 miles from the only place in Canada they'd ever been seen before. According to scientists examining the area, Point Rosee, the ancient site can be traced to the Vikings. If it was not established by the.

Archaeology report confirms no evidence of Norse presence

However, the site may have witnessed periodic reoccupation as Viking explorers returned to Vinland over multiple voyages in search of the resources and farmland so valued by the Norse. We. Scientists found a fire-cracked stone and some mangled scraps of iron unearthed from a muddy patch of ground called Point Rosee. Archaeologist Sarah Parcak says it is either an ancient Viking site or an entirely new culture that looks exactly like the Norse and we don't know what it is ↑La probable découverte d'un 2e site viking en Amérique relance les spéculations. AFP-Artikel bei L'Express, 2. April 2016, abgerufen am 29. Oktober 2016 (französisch). ↑ Point Rosee, Codroy Valley, NL (ClBu-07) 2016 Test Excavations ↑ a b c Mark Strauss: Discovery could rewrite history of vikings in the New World. National Geographic, 31.. März 2016, abgerufen The site, discovered in an area called Point Rosee in southern Newfoundland, is 400 miles (643km) south west of a Viking settlement found in L'Anse aux Meadows during the 1960s. Now, one expert.. View From Space Hints at a New Viking Site in North America Douglas Bolender, left, and Sarah H. Parcak, right, looking for evidence of a Viking presence at a remote site, called Point Rosee by..

All posts tagged: Point Rosee. Canada. Published by The Viking Archive. Norse sites and settlement in Canada. December 8, 2018. Leave a comment. Essays / Historical Places. A new Viking site in North America? Published by The Viking Archive. When space archaeology finds its metal. April 6, 2016. Leave a comment. Historical Places / News Articles. Subscribe! Please leave this field empty. A. This site is located about 300 miles southwest of the first discovery. The archaeologists studied satellite images of the land taken from space. They found evidence of a possible Viking structure buried at Point Rosee. That's on the Canadian island of Newfoundland. Archaeologists are now digging in the muddy earth at Point Rosee. They are. Point Rosee: a Second Viking Colony Site Found in Newfoundland, Canada It's a two-mile trudge through forested, swampy ground to reach Point Rosee, a narrow, windswept peninsula stretching from southern Newfoundland into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Last June, a team of archaeologists was drawn to this remote part of Canada by a modern-day treasure map: satellite imagery revealing ground. The recent discovery of a second pre-Columbian (Viking?) iron ore working plant at Point Rosee in Newfoundland, thought to have been active at least five centuries before Christopher Columbus 'discovered' the Americas, intrigued William such that he was curious to find out if there was a firm trading and exploration alliance between the Vikings and the Phoenicians with Newfoundland

Friday, April 1, 2016 Point Rosee: Another Viking Site in North America? Using infrared satellite images, space archaeologist Sarah Parcak searched the coast of eastern Canada for sites that might be related to the Vikings. She identified several possible targets, including one in Newfoundland called Point Rosee Exhausted but happy, they had been led to Point Rosee in Newfoundland by the most high-tech weaponry in the modern archaeological arsenal - satellite data captured 383 miles (600km) above the.. If the findings are confirmed, Point Rosee would be only the second Viking settlement ever discovered in North America, and the first such site to be found since 1960. Point Rosee is more than 300. Point rosee newfoundland vikings, i able. Attention heathens, a remarkable burial site you. Sign up today to the city to ireland. Then the cardinals on how you consent to successfully land on sunday. Dendrochronological dating site - how to browse through onlin A test excavation in the peninsula of Point Rosee in southwestern Newfoundland, Canada, has unearthed evidence of a Viking settlement.If the site is confirmed as Norse, it will be the second of its kind and history books will have to be rewritten because Point Rosee is significantly more to the west than the Vikings were thought to have traveled

Point Rosee Vikings settlement sites North American Sarah Parca . And, boy, was that one big, whopping moment. The Bulldogs found themselves on the ropes against Oklahoma and its highly decorated quarterback Baker Mayfield ; Derrick Rose has signed a one-year contract with the Minnesota Timberwolves for the 2018-2019 season, the team announced Wednesday. Rose was originally signed by the. The Vikings Uncovered detailing what has been discovered at Point Rosee aired on BBC in the UK last week I recorded it and watched it today. Sarah Parcak (the space archaeologist) laid out the satellite imagery of the area with her belief that the site represents a Viking settlement, referring to the known site at L'Anse aux Meadows as a transit camp for more extensive. Scientists working with the BBC will today reveal that they believe they have discovered only the second known Viking site in North America, on the Canadian island of Newfoundland, 400 miles.. Pointe Rosée (Point Rosee en anglais) est une péninsule du sud-ouest de l'île de Terre-Neuve dans l'océan Atlantique. Une équipe d' archéologues conduite par Sarah Parcak y a découvert en 2016 ce qu'ils considèrent comme étant les restes d'un village viking L'Anse aux Meadows is so far the only confirmed Viking site in North America. But folklore suggests that there might have been more. A CGI representation of the alleged Viking site at Point Rosee...

Such misuse of Viking history and imagery reemerged in the twentieth century among some groups promoting white supremacy. She also expressed doubt that Point Rosee was a Norse site as there are no good landing sites for their boats and there are steep cliffs between the shoreline and the excavation site. In their November 8, 2017, report Sarah Parcak and Gregory Mumford, co-directors of. UPDATE: April 6: Adding new TED weblink and editing links page; April 5: Only adding a table of contents (mainly to aid media requests for images and/or caption details); April 4: Three sessions with a most recent addition of some good links, plu A potential Viking settlement discovered in southern Newfoundland may reveal that the pioneering seafarers travelled further into North America than previously thought, but experts caution there's still lots of wor If the results are born out through further research, Point Rosee would become just the second verified Viking site in North America. Researchers believe Point Rosee, about 600 kilometres south of L'Anse aux Meadows, may be the second Norse settlement discovered in Newfoundland

Point Rosee. This is the site that most of us have heard about in recent news. This particular discovery was found in southern Newfoundland. Professor Sarah Parcak and her colleagues at the. Known its gentle rolling hills and lush farmland, the Codroy Valley area may have welcomed its most significant group of tourists last year. gentle rolling hills and lush farmland, the Codroy Valley area may have welcomed its most significant group of tourists last year Parcak's Point Rosee findings will be explored in greater detail in the two-hour television documentary, NOVA: Vikings Unearthed, that will premiere online on Monday at 3:30 p.m. EDT and will be broadcast in the U.S. on Wednesday, April 6, on PBS at 9 p.m. EDT

Thor loser: Vikings likely didn't live on south coast of

Satellite imagery of Point Rosee in Southern Newfoundland in Canada has revealed a surprising discovery: an ancient Viking site that has the potential to rewrite the history of North America. The. Satellite imagery of Point Rosee in Southern Newfoundland in Canada has revealed a surprising discovery: an ancient Viking site that has the potential to rewrite the history of North America.. The new site is several hundred miles south of the only other Viking site in North America, called L'Anse aux Meadows. The sagas suggest a short period of activity and a very brief and failed. Point Rosee (franska: Pointe Rosée) är en udde i provinsen Newfoundland och Labrador i Kanada. Den ligger på ön Newfoundlands sydvästra sida utanför Kanadas Atlantkust. Trakten är glest befolkad och närmaste stad är Channel-Port aux Basques. Arkeologiska utgrävningar pågick på platsen 2015-2016 Point Rosee. Archaeologists may have discovered additional Viking settlements in the New World April 1, 2016 at 5:07 pm Archaeologists have uncovered evidence of a second Viking settlement in the.

Searching for the Vikings: 3 Sites Possibly Found in

  1. The Viking Trail begins just north of Deer Lake, but the road does not end at L'Anse aux Meadows where my journey finishes. New Viking settlements are still being discovered in Newfoundland, with recent satellite imaging pointing archaeologists to a new excavation site at Point Rosee, 240km south of Deer Lake. In time, this could extend the.
  2. Point Rosee (Frans: Pointe Rosée) is een landtong nabij het dorp Millville in het uiterste zuidwesten van het Canadese eiland Newfoundland. In 2015 werd Point Rosée na satellietbeeldanalyses uitgeroepen tot een mogelijke tweede nederzetting van de Vikingen in Noord-Amerika (na de eveneens Newfoundlandse site van L'Anse aux Meadows)
  3. Dr. Doug Bolender and Dr. Sarah Parcak on site in Point Rosee, Nfld., in this undated handout photo. A United States archeologist says a Viking settlement may have been uncovered in southern Newfoundland, though there's still lots of work to be done to verify the find. Douglas Bolender of the University of Massachusetts Boston was part of a research team that made the potential discovery last.
  4. Point Rosee could reinforce that story or completely change it, if the dating is different from L'Anse aux Meadows. We could end up with a much longer period of Norse activity in the New World
  5. A group of archeologists has been excavating the newly found site at the Point Rosee, a narrow, windswept peninsula on the most western point of the island. To date, the only confirmed Viking site on the American continent is L'Anse aux Meadows, a 1,000-year-old way station found in 1960 on the northern tip of Newfoundland

Possible Viking Site at Point Rosee Newfoun....kmz (751 B) Last Edit: Apr 8, 2016 7:48:57 GMT by jeanthie. jeanthie Using satellites to monitor and study: 1) Melting of permafrost in wetlands 2) Retrogressive landslides 3) Beavers re-engineering landscapes 4) Changes in Boreal and Sub Arctic Ecosystems 5) Regional Land Use Planning and Management 6) Retreat of Glacial Lakes 7) Wildland fires. Discovery Of 1,000-Year-Old Viking Site In Canada Could Change Our Understanding Of History . Sian Broderick. Published 11:41 AM, Tuesday April 05 2016 GMT+1. Share Tweet. The possible discovery. Viking settlement discovered on Point Rosee in southern Newfoundland Iron ore processing at the site dates to between 800AD and 1300AD Archaeologists say the discovery is opening a 'new chapter.

Point Rosée is een landtong nabij het dorp Codroy in het uiterste zuidwesten van het eiland Newfoundland.In 2015 werd Point Rosée na satellietbeeldanalyses uitgeroepen tot een mogelijke tweede nederzetting van de Vikingen in Noord-Amerika, na de eveneens op Newfoundland gelegen site van L'Anse aux Meadows.Archeologische opgravingen spraken dit weliswaar tegen en het slotrapport van 2017 gaf. Another possible Viking site, located at a place called Point Rosee in southern Newfoundland, was discovered using satellite imagery. Credit: Image courtesy Point Rosee Project . Three archaeological sites that may have been used by Vikings around 1,000 years ago were excavated recently in Canada. If confirmed, the discoveries would add to the single known Viking settlement in the New World. Magnetometer readings later taken at the remote site, called Point Rosee by researchers, a grassy headland above a rocky beach an hour's trek from the nearest road, showed elevated iron readings. And trenches that were then dug exposed Viking-style turf walls along with ash residue, roasted ore called bog iron and a fire-cracked boulder — signs of metallurgy not associated with native. If confirmed by further research, the site at Point Rosee in Newfoundland will show that the Vikings traveled much farther into North America than previously known, pushing the boundary of their explorations over 300 miles to the southwest. The discovery is the subject of a two-hour special called Vikings Unearthed. The program is a co-production between PBS and the BBC. It will first.

Possible 3rd Norse site near Point Rosee N

  1. The site is located on Point Rosee, near the small community of Codroy, Newfoundland, and is about 600 kilometres away from the first settlement, which was discovered decades ago on the province's northern tip. The first discovery rewrote history, and lead researcher, Sarah Parcak, says this new site could unravel even more secrets about the Vikings, like whether they explored further into.
  2. Possible second Viking site found in Newfoundland. Excavations at a site called Point Rosee (shown) in Newfoundland have found hints of Norse presence about 1,000 years ago
  3. The new site, at Point Rosee, is 300 miles further south - potentially the furthest known point of Viking expansion ever found. Sarah Parcak, a professor at the University of Alabama at.
  4. That led them to the southwestern corner of Newfoundland and a site researchers are now calling Point Rosee. We definitely did not think it could be Norse initially, Parcak said
  5. If the results are born out through further research, Point Rosee would become just the second verified Viking site in North America. The first site is at L'Anse Aux Meadows, near the northern-most tip of Newfoundland, about 600 kilometres away. Evidence of that thousand-year-old settlement was discovered in the 1960s and took years to verify

Discovery of 1,000-year-old Viking site in Canada could

The site we found, called Point Rosee, would have been a good place to settle. It has streams for fresh water and a nearby beach for fishing — not to mention a landing area for ships. Beyond that, the site is close to the only valley in Newfoundland warm enough for agriculture. Could this site have been a Norse settlement? The bog iron processing certainly suggests it's a possibility. The potential discovery of a second Viking site in Point Rosee, Newfoundland may spell big news for the tourism industry on the island's southwest coast. Local residents were abuzz on Friday after research from an international team of archaeologists revealed the possibility of a Viking site in the area. If the results are verified through further research, then Point Rosee would be only the.

That being said, it's too soon to extrapolate anything on Point Rosee. The site was barely surveyed, we don't know how long it was occupied or when. L'Anse-aux-Meadows was used only for a few decades around the year 1000. We'll see if Point Rosee was used in the same time frame or longer and how big it was For context, here is a CBC article on the new site. L'Anse aux Meadows, the only previously confirmed Viking settlement in North America (outside of Greenland), is located at the northernmost tip of Newfoundland. The new site is at Point Rosee, roughly 600 km south of L'Anse aux Meadows, in the southwest of Newfoundland Discovery Could Rewrite History of Vikings in New World ( Part 3 of 3 )-END ( By By Mark Strauss - Photos = Robert Clark & Satellite - Photo = Digitalglobe --- + proofread, edited & photo selection,..

A site like Point Rosee has the potential to reveal what that initial wave of Norse colonization looked like not only for Newfoundland but for the rest of the North Atlantic, says Bolender. While of great historical interest, the Viking colonization of North America didn't amount to much. It left no substantial settlements, no genetic traces in the native populations that anyone has been. A thousand-year-old Viking colony might have been unearthed in Point Rosee, on the Canadian island of Newfoundland, Canada. The finding of the old Viking location on the Canadian coast could drastically change the history, which would mean that Europeans were in the Americas some 500 years before Christopher Columbus and his team set foot in the US in 1492 Archaeologists have discovered a potential new Viking site in Newfoundland, Canada, which would mark the farthest south that the Vikings have ever been known to settle. The site was discovered last summer at Point Rosee through the examination of infrared satellite images that picked up manmade shapes hidden by vegetation, leading to the discovery of a fire-cracked stone and some mangled. The only other Viking site ever to be found in North America was at L'Anse Aux Meadows, Newfoundland, about 300 miles from Point Rosee. (Side note: I remember they found Viking remains and weapons near Hudson river back in 2015, when they stated that the Vikings most likely got into conflict with the indigenous people of the region. Just an. Three archaeological sites that may have been used by Vikings around 1,000 years ago were excavated recently in Canada. If confirmed, the discoveries would add to the single known Viking settlement in the New World, located at L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland. Excavated i

Viking settlement 'Hop' is in New Brunswick, claims

Archaeologist Sarah Parcak, a National Geographic Fellow, is credited with discovering the possible Viking site at Point Rosee. She specializes in 'space archaeology,' the emerging practice of. Discovery Could Rewrite History of Vikings . PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT CLARK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC source: National Geographic POINT ROSEE, CANADA It's a two-mile trudge through forested, swampy ground to reach Point Rosee, a narrow, windswept peninsula stretching from southern Newfoundland into the Gulf of St. Lawrence Despite all the initial hype and the hope of it being a tourism boon for southwestern Newfoundland, there is no evidence the Norse once occupied Point Rosee. An archaeological team, led by renowned American archaeologist Sarah Parcak, spent part If Point Rosee is a Viking settlement site (jury is still out on it, but I suspect it probably is), how tough would it have been for the Vikings to head a bit more south? I'm hesitant to say that it'd be easy, because it certainly would not have been. But the Vikings were masters at travel, and if anyone could've navigated uncharted territory, it would have been them. But North America. Viking Shadows In The Valley. Home. Articles. Videos. Belanger Memorial School. Maps. Contact. Resources. More... The man who cried Viking.

Wikinger: Das Geheimnis von Point Rosee STERN

  1. When I visited, a couple of months before the trip to Point Rosee, I held a piece of skull in my hand, presumably from a monk. If Parcak has found evidence of another Viking site, it will.
  2. The trenches that were dug up at the site, called Point Rosee, exposed Viking-style turf walls, ash, roasted iron ore (bog iron) and a fire cracked boulder. The artifacts were dated from the Norse.
  3. New potential Viking site discovered in southern Newfoundland. by Aly T, The Canadian Press. Posted Apr 1, 2016 11:52 am EDT. Last Updated Apr 1, 2016 at 4:40 pm EDT . National; Dr. Doug Bolender and Dr. Sarah Parcak on site in Point Rosee, Nfld., in this undated handout photo. A United States archeologist says a Viking settlement may have been uncovered in southern Newfoundland, though.
  4. The remote site was given the name Point Rosee by researchers, reports CTV News. It is about an hours drive from the nearest road and is located on a grassy headland at almost the very western tip.
  5. Point rosee wikinger 2017 Presse - BeamSuntory - Deutschlan . Verwendung von Cookies. Um die Webseite optimal gestalten und fortlaufend verbessern zu können, verwendet Beam Suntory Cookies. Durch die weitere Nutzung der. Handlung. Nachdem der christliche König Aguar vom Thron gestürzt wurde, übernimmt der hinterhältige Wikinger Sligon die.
  6. Viking Journeywoman. 178 likes. Experience exceptional travel experiences in Estonia. The Vikings traveled here to trade. Courage to go beyond known..
  7. The only other Viking site in North America was found in the 1960s at L'Anse Aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland, about 300 miles from Point Rosee. Photos: Iron Age Fashio
At Point Rosee, within a few kilometres of MacIsaac's

Possible Viking Site in Canada - YouTub

  1. Here's what the new site, called Point Rosee, looks like from the western end during the summer. Photo Courtesy Greg Mumford The Vikings, a seafaring group from Scandinavia that traveled around.
  2. ed the Canadian coastline to look for more Viking settlement as part of a BBC program Vikings Unearthed. She found some interesting shapes in Point Rosee on Newfoundland and a test excavation she found what she thought.
  3. Guided by ancient Norse sagas and modern satellite images, searchers discover what may be North America's second Viking site. It's a two-mile trudge through forested, swampy ground to reach Point Rosee, a narrow, windswept peninsula stretching from southern Newfoundland into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Last June, a team of archaeologists was drawn to this remote part of Canada by a modern-day.
  4. The possible discovery of a 1,000-year-old Viking site in Canada could rewrite history as we know it. Advert . Archaeologists have unearthed a stone used for iron work at Point Rosee in.
  5. My hope was to drive up to L'Anse Aux Meadows or Point Rosee, but it dosnt appear that we will have enough time make such a long trip. Does anyone know of any Nordic/Viking ruins, dig sites, or anything at all for that matter, that is open to visitors and closer to St. John's or the Trinity Bay area? Any advice would be greatly appreciated
  6. If the results are born out through further research, Point Rosee would become just the second verified Viking site in North America. he first site is at L'Anse Aux Meadows, near the northern-most tip of Newfoundland, about 600 kilometres away. Evidence of that thousand-year-old settlement was discovered in the 1960s and took years to verify
  7. ute film for BBC One this Monday 4 April.
'Vikings Unearthed': Satellite spots lost village in America

Hammered Out Bits: Another season at Point Rosee

But Bolender warned that a bounty of evidence needs to be uncovered before the new site can be confirmed as a Viking settlement. Researchers plan to return to Point Rosee this summer to conduct further excavations. What we're really going to be looking for is an overwhelming amount of evidence that will include additional, very clear Norse-style architecture and ideally, distinctive Norse. At Point Rosee, she saw a faint difference in the vegetation in the form of a rectangle—possibly a structure. Investigations on-site showed the turf walls and hearth. The site has bog iron, natural deposits of the metal that would have been very attractive to Vikings. It has other features, too, that may have attracted the wandering Norsemen Another possible Viking site, located at a place called Point Rosee in southern Newfoundland, was discovered using satellite imagery. More If confirmed, the discoveries would add to the single known Viking settlement in the New World, located at L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland

Talk:Point Rosee/Archive 1 - Wikipedi

Was Point Rosee a Viking outpost a thousand or so years ago? The evidence thus far is promising. The turf structure that partially surrounds the hearth is nothing like the shelters built by indigenous peoples who lived in Newfoundland at the time, nor by Basque fishermen and whalers who arrived in the 16th century. And, while iron slag may be fairly generic, there aren't any known. Pointe Rosée Pointe Rosée est une péninsule du sud-ouest de l'île de Terre-Neuve dans l'océan Atlantique. Une équipe d'archéologues conduite par Sarah Parcak y a découvert en 2016 ce qu'ils considèrent comme étant les restes d'un village viking

remote sensing in the news: Point Rosee

NOVA: Vikings Unearthed DVD - AV Item,NOVA: Vikings Unearthed While infamous for their fearsome conquests, the Vikings were also expert seafarers, skilled traders, and courageous explorers who travelled far and wide from Scandinavia to Europe and into Asia. The 1960s discovery of the only Viking site in North America, on the northernmost tip of Newfoundland, proved that the Norse had actually.

Vikings in North America: A Saga's New Chapte

Discovery Of Second Viking Site Point Rosee In NorthNew Viking site in North America? Experts eye satellite

On the trail of Vikings: Latest search for Norse in North

New Evidence Suggests America Was Discovered by Vikings
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